Use #42 for a Pocket Knife: Separating Stuck Legos

1. Use #42 for a Pocket Knif...

I have the unfortunate habit of biting my nails to smithereens and because of this horrible, horrible affliction I have an even harder time than most mortals separating stuck Legos.  Enter my pocket knife and it’s thin, sharp and...
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Pocket Knife Tricks

Pocket Knife Tricks

I was browsing YouTube in preparation to write this article and found that according to YouTube’s auto suggest feature, pocket knife tricks is the second most popular search term. Off I went to see what the hoopla was about pocket knife tricks, and low and behold I found some pretty cool stuff.

Disclaimer: Don’t try any of the tricks shown in these videos as you’ll probably end up hurting yourself, innocent bystanders or your pocket knife itself.

First up is the insanely popular Butterfly Knife Tricks video from NICKisNOTaTOY. The quality isn’t great but the tricks are fantastic. My fingers hurt just watching.

Next up is a Swiss Army knife trick from user whynabile. Over a half a million people have watched whynabile turn his Swiss Army knife into a pin storing wonder. The video is shaky and YT haters are in full force but for those with this particular knife, it may help you stuff another tool into your arsenal.

Back to Butterfly Knives. This little video shows a “trainer” which is bascically a butterfly knife without the pesky sharp blades.

If whipping your knife out of your pocket with heavily tattooed arms and waving it around like a nunchuck was a competitive sport, romeodelta1178 would deserve a medal:

Finally something useful! The Backwoodsman’s Institute shows us how to cut down a tree with a pocket knife. About 2:45 into the video the action begins, as we watch the outdoorsman’s expert pound his pocket knife, beaver-style around the entire trunk of the tree.

Want to spin your Rambo sized knife around your thumb in your bedroom? ATCKDFND has your covered, complete with his own bloopers for that authentic stabby feel.

For those of your preferring the wife beater, pony tail wielding style knife master, MasterFrederick shows us how to spin and flip a frighten large knife that you’d never fit in your pocket unless you wore medieval knight armor.

Watch “Making my first pocket knife” on YouTube

This guy apparently made his own pocket knife.  Not sure about the safety aspect but you have to admire his efforts.

Watch “Home Improvements & Maintenance : Removing Rust From Pocket Knives” on YouTube

Use #41 for a Pocket Knife: Cut Fishing Line

Use #41 for a Pocket Knife: Cut Fishing Line

All star use!

This one seems obvious and that’s because it is. When you fish you’re always cutting line, whether it’s to attach new bait, tie in that new fancy expensive and useless lure, or because your idiot friend got his line caught…. again… in the trees and this time couldn’t free it by yanking as hard as he could. A fishermen’s best tool is his knife.

Use #40 for a Pocket Knife: Whittle a Stick

Use #40 for a Pocket Knife: Whittle a Stick

Being in Maine for the month of August presents ample time for a pocket knife enthusiast to explore his or her craft.  My daughters were playing outside with some small sticks and asked me to whittle them into knives.  That request was denied however I did shave the bark off of one, and carefully instructed both girls the proper way to whittle a stick with a pocket knife. The next day I started making a handle, although I haven’t gotten very far.

Use #39 for a Pocket Knife: Attach Fishing Weight

Use #39 for a Pocket Knife: Attach Fishing Weight

While up north this summer I did a fair amount of unsuccessful fishing and therefore had ample opportunity to use and drop into the water my trusty pocket knife. Thankfully I only did the latter a couple times and was able to retrieve it each time, the other opportunities including fastening weights onto fishing lines. I would use the blunt attachments or even the knife itself on a rock to squish the lead (are they lead?) weights onto the line sufficiently so they would not fall into the water or fly off and hit someone in the eye.

Use #38 for a Pocket Knife: Fix a Sharp Metal Edge

Use #38 for a Pocket Knife: Fix a Sharp Metal Edge

I drink latte’s in the morning and that involves opening cans of espresso coffee with a can opener. A side effect of opening the can with my manual can opener is that the very end of the metal edge gets bent up exposing a sharp metal edge. Seemingly not very dangerous this edge can catch and slice your hand/finger as you scoop espresso from the bottom of the can.

I grabbed my pocket knife and used the can opener/flat head tool to push down the metal edge of the can minimizing the chance of my catching my hand or finger.

Use #37 for a Pocket Knife: Attaching a License Plate

Use #37 for a Pocket Knife: Attaching a License Plate

We make frequent long distance trips up north and through the power of Craigslist found a high top conversion van that we thought would be perfect for our family. Off we went to meet the owner of said van and inspect and test drive the van, or be murdered with an axe – the two possible outcomes of any Craigslist transaction.

The van checked out and soon we wanted to come back and take it for a test drive. Without a current registration the van had no plates. I needed to attach one of my plates for the quick evaluation ride down a side street, but didn’t grab a screw driver. Out came my pocket knife and it’s flat head screw driver attachment which made quick work of the license plate screws allowing us to move the plate over and set off down for the first test drive.

Use #36 for a Pocket Knife: Sticker Removal

Use #36 for a Pocket Knife: Sticker Removal

My daughter stuck a sticker (literary master I am not) to a rather expensive bench in our kitchen breakfast nook and luckily having not been too hard pressed, the small blade of my Swiss Army knife lifted the edge and I was able to pull the sticker cleanly off the bench. A sharper more razor like blade would have been able to remove a more stubborn sticker due to the preferable angle of attack and blade to sticker exposure area.

Use #35 for a Pocket Knife: Sharpen A Pencil

Use #35 for a Pocket Knife: Sharpen A Pencil

My daughter recently produced a pencil for homework with a completely broken tip. Instead of using a pencil sharpener I took out the small blade of my pocket knife and sharpened the tip “carpenter style”. It made a mess of shavings (unlike the photo, more chunky) on my coffee table but did the job sufficiently to complete the homework.

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